M2 Pro vs. M2 Max: Which One Should You Choose for Your?

M2 Pro vs. M2 Max: Which One Should You Choose for Your?

In January 2023, Apple MacBook announced its new Apple M2 Pro and M2 Max chips. Along with the new chips, Apple has launched new 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros. If you’re thinking about purchasing one of these laptops, you may have doubts about which configuration best suits your needs. Both the M2 Pro and M2 Max are very powerful, so it’s not an easy decision.

We’ll compare the specifications, performance, and price of these chips to help you pick the best option for your needs.

M2 Pro vs. M2 Max: Specs

As mentioned above, both the M2 Pro and M2 Max chips are very powerful. However, there are a number of key differences to note. The M2 Pro features up to 12 CPU cores and 19 GPU cores. The M2 Max, on the other hand, has 12 CPU cores and up to 38 GPU cores. Both chips offer more cores than their respective M1 versions, though the M2 Max sees a greater increase with six more GPU cores, compared to three more than the previous generation in the M2 Pro.

If don’t know what a nanometer is, it’s a unit of measure for length, and the Apple M2 Pro is built on a five-nanometer process. This new chip has a total of 40 billion transistors, about 20% more than we saw in the M1 Pro. Bandwidth comes in at 200GB/s, with up to 32GB of low-latency unified memory.

Regarding the M2 Max, the CPU now has 12 cores compared to 10 in the previous generation, with a GPU of up to 38 cores and a 16-core Neural Engine. The M2 Max has 67 billion transistors. With this chip, the bandwidth comes in at 400GB/s, double that of the M2 Pro and four times that of an M2. It also supports up to 96GB of unified memory. The CPU is exactly the same as the M2 Pro, but the GPU is significantly more powerful and features a larger L2 cache.

Specs M2 M2 Pro M2 Max
Transistors 20 billion 40 billion 67 billion
Memory controller 100GB/s unified memory bandwidth 200GB/s of unified memory bandwidth 400GB/s of unified memory bandwidth
RAM 24GB unified memory
LPDDR5
Up to 32GB unified memory
LPDDR5
Up to 96GB unified memory
LPDDR5
GPU cores 10 cores 19 cores 38 cores
CPU cores 7/8 10/12 12
CPU configuration Hybrid configuration:

4 high-performance cores

4 energy-efficient cores

Hybrid configuration:

8 high-performance cores

4 energy-efficient cores

Hybrid configuration:

8 high-performance cores

4 energy-efficient cores

 

Apple M2 vs M2 Pro vs M2 Max chips: What’s the difference

 

M2 Pro vs. M2 Max: Price

Both the M2 Pro and M2 Max are high-end Apple silicon chips, so their prices are also high. However, the difference between them is substantial. Right now, you can buy a 14-inch MacBook Pro with the entry-level M2 Pro chip for $1,999 in the US. Likewise, the 12-core CPU version of this chip would cost you an additional $300.

The M2 Max version with 30 or 38 GPU cores would cost you $2,899 and $3,099, respectively. In other words, from the entry-level M2 Pro to the entry-level M2 Max there is a difference of almost $1,000.

I phone 15 pro max

You have to consider what you need a new MacBook Pro for. If you’re familiar with what CPUs do, and you’re going to be doing mostly CPU-demanding tasks, like video editing or advanced coding, the M2 Pro seems like a better choice. As we have already seen, there is hardly any difference in this area between the two chips, and with the money you would save you can always buy more RAM or storage to future-proof your investment.

On the other hand, if you are going to perform GPU-demanding tasks such as 3D graphic rendering or modeling, the M2 Max with its 30 or 38 GPU cores is probably better for you.

If you’re still torn between these two chips, or you’re not sure which is the best option for you, our recommendation is to go to an Apple Store and buy a MacBook Pro with the M2 Pro chip. Try it for a few days, and if you find that the power isn’t enough, take advantage of Apple’s return policy and exchange it for one with the M2 Max chip.

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